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Bible39s view on interracial dating

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Colossians makes it clear that from God's perspective all are one in Christ.The Bible is clear that when both parties are believers (equally yoked), interracial marriage is not wrong.

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A loving Christian couple may accommodate well to many kinds of differences between themselves."If you think about communities in the Midwest, in places such as [rural] Wisconsin and Montana, if you're white and even if you're open to interracially dating, there are not that many people of color around," Yancey says."Chances are, if you're a person of color, you're more likely to be exposed to European Americans than vice versa." However, his analysis also found that neither living in an integrated neighborhood nor attending an integrated place of worship boosted people's interdating rates as much as attending an integrated school. adults, 86 percent of people ages 18 to 29 approved of marriage between blacks and whites, but just 30 percent of those ages 65 and older approved of such marriages.More than one-third (38 percent) of black students had dated a Hispanic, while 10 percent of black students had dated an Asian student.Teens surveyed also had an overwhelmingly positive view of interracial dating.All couples contemplating marriage need to give thoughtful consideration to a variety of practical issues, some of which may have no clear Biblical imperative.

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For example, while no more than 11 percent of the teens surveyed thought a white-and-Hispanic or white-and-Asian couple would be ostracized by their respective racial or ethnic groups, about one-quarter of those surveyed said that a white and a black student dating each other would face problems from other white or black students in school.

Given these figures, it's not surprising that Gallup reported that black students faced the highest rates of resistance from their parents over interracial dating of any group surveyed.

Ludwig says such parental wariness is not unusual, given blacks' dimmer view of the state of U. "The experience of living as a black person and as a white person in this country is quite different, despite substantial progress since the 1960s." Ludwig and Yancey both agree that interdating is unlikely to increase significantly over the coming decade.

"It's not increasing as fast as some people might be thinking," says Yancey, who says that U. trends overall are trailing media depictions of the phenomenon.

Indeed, teens seem rather blasé about the significance of interdating: Only about one-quarter (24 percent) of the teens surveyed by Gallup thought the United States would be better off if more people interdated, while 9 percent thought the country would be worse off.